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2006 Annual Report Special Education Assistive Technology (SEAT) Center

2006 Annual Report
Special Education Assistive Technology
(SEAT) Center
Phil Parette, Ed.D.
Director
Brian Wojcik, M.S.Ed., ATP
Coordinator
George Peterson-Karlan, Ph.D.
Julia Stoner, Ed.D.
Emily Watts, Ph.D.
Ann Beck, Ph.D.
Special Projects Faculty
January 22, 2007
SEAT Center 2006 Annual Report 2
SEAT Center Advisory Group
2004-06
Wilhelmina Gunther
Illinois Assistive Technology Project
Dr. Paul Dulle
Infinitec
Tom Heimsoth, Chair
Oswego, IL
Dr. George Peterson-Karlan
Dr. George Peterson-Karlan
Dr. Ann Beck
Speech Pathology & Audiology
Department of Special Education
Department of Special Education
Corey Tello
Mackinaw Valley Special Education Association
Dr. Ann Caldwell
Disability Concerns
Christopher Kelly
State Farm Insurance
Vickie Wilson
Coalition for Citizens with Disabilities
Kristin Starks
Normal, IL
Dr. Paula Smith
Nokomis, FL
SEAT Representatives
Dr. Deborah Curtis, Dean
College of Education
Dr. James Thompson, Chair
Department of Special Education
Mira Mihalovich
ISU Foundation
Gail Lamb
ISU Foundation
Bob Aaron
Marketing and Communications
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INTRODUCTION
The Illinois Board of Higher Education approved the establishment of the Special Education Assistive Technology (SEAT) Center on August 21, 2001. The SEAT Center, housed in Fairchild Hall on the Illinois State University (ISU) campus, is composed of a community of individuals, including faculty, staff, school administrators and teachers, professionals from public and private organizations, business personnel, family members, and consumers with disabilities.
The SEAT Center staff is composed of Dr. Phil Parette, Director, who is also Professor in the Department of Special Education; Brian Wojcik, Coordinator; and two graduate assistants. The operations of the Center are realized through a ‘community’ of individuals, including SEAT Faculty Associates across departments; ISU administrative personnel; SEAT Foundation Director, Mira Mihalovich; faculty across disciplines; administrators, teachers, and related service personnel in public school systems; family members and their children with disabilities; members of public and private organizations; and representatives of the business sector. An Advisory Board, representing a wide array of constituencies, provides guidance and direction regarding SEAT activities as needed.
VISION
The scope of the SEAT Center is noted in its vision statement:
The SEAT Center will be a national and international center of excellence where partnerships advance the knowledge and practice of assistive technology, enhancing teaching, learning and living.
MISSION
The vision statement of the SEAT Center is further clarified in its mission statement that includes five facets:
To be a:
• Center of innovation where knowledge and practices regarding technology are created, integrated and disseminated to present and future primary, secondary and higher education professionals and people with disabilities and their families.
• Center of access to those teaching, developing and using the tools of technology.
• Center of instructional excellence where students, practicing teachers, and educational professionals can learn and practice technology solutions available for use in school, work and community.
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• Center of accessible technology solutions needed by Illinois State University students with disabilities to be successful in their university experience.
• State, national, and international partner with education and industry in creating and sharing instructional, training, and support resources for educational professionals who are preparing students to be world citizens.
VALUES
Specific values that guide the Center’s operation include:
• Individuality – Of instruction focused on each diverse learner with unique educational needs and potential
• Growth – In research, application, and service both inside and outside of the classroom.
• Partnership – With families, communities, business, education, government, and industry at the local, state, and national level.
• Innovation – In a rapidly changing and continually evolving field of assistive technology.
ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN 2006
This Executive Summary is organized to summarize various accomplishments of the SEAT Center during 2006. Activities and achievements are organized around each of the five Vision Statements.
Vision 1: Center of Innovation
Key Accomplishments:
• Scholarly works
• Professional development activities
• Teacher-focused podcast
The first vision of the SEAT Center’s mission is to be a Center of Innovation, or vehicle through which AT knowledge and practices are created, integrated, and disseminated. Mechanisms through which innovation has been demonstrated include (a) scholarly works, (b) professional development activities, and (c) support of a teacher-focused podcast targeting topics related to technology and students with diverse learning needs.
Scholarly Works
One mechanism through which the Center successfully addressed this facet was through the scholarly productivity of the Director, Coordinator, SEAT Associates, and collaborations with other ISU faculty members. During 2006, faculty generated a substantive number of scholarly works related to AT including peer-
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reviewed journals (n=12), textbook chapters (n=7), books (n=2), special reports (n=1), and presentations at professional meetings (n=15) (see Appendix A). A number of innovative research projects have been initiated to examine a variety of AT strategies and approaches that will provide the foundation for future product development.
Guest Lectures
In April, the SEAT Center Director was the Invited Harris Lecturer at the 2nd Annual Special Education Symposium, Benerd School of Education, University of the Pacific, in Stockton, California. The topic of this presentation was Public Schools vs. the Digital World: A Clash of Cultures. Representing the College of Education in October, the Director delivered a Keynote Address titled, Technology and Inclusion of Students with Disabilities: Digital Age Challenges of Preparing Future Educators, at the First Pacific Rim Conference on Education in Sapporo, Japan.
Professional Development Activities
Access AT Module
Two parallel activities—a federal grant from the U.S. Department of Education (National AT Coalition) and a research grant from the National Center for Technology Innovation (i.e., Project SOLO™ described below)—has enabled the ongoing development of an interactive module titled, Assistive Technology for Struggling Writers. The module will be distributed to teachers in Illinois through Infinitec and to teachers across Kansas via the Infinitec AT Coalition established with funding through the National AT Coalition grant. Teachers participating in this training will commit to a five-year outcomes monitoring process to examine both student and teacher outcomes resulting from the training over time.
Project SOLO™
Receipt of a National Center for Technology Innovation (NCT) Technology in the Works grant in 2005–The Effectiveness of SOLO™ on the Writing Outcomes of Students with Learning and Academic Disabilities–culminated in significant findings impacting classroom technology usage with students nationally. The final report of this project is archived at the NCTI website at http://www.nationaltechcenter.org/rfp/projectSOLOwritingoutcomes.asp.
NCTI Writing Matrix
The SEAT Center secured a contract to develop a Writing Matrix to be archived at the NCTI website at http://www.techmatrix.org/. This matrix synthesizes the research conducted through Project SOLO and the National Assistive Technology Coalition grant, and is complemented by a Math Matrix developed by the University of Kentucky and a Reading Matrix developed by NCTI. Each of these
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materials provides an invaluable resource to education professionals, researchers, vendors, and other constituents internationally.
Region IV (Texas) Module
Under contract to the Region IV Education Services Center, the SEAT Center developed a professional development module titled, Technology Supports for Struggling Writers: Research-Based Approaches, to be used in Texas. The module will potentially impact 54 school districts having more than 78,000 education professionals and serving more than 1 million students in the Houston area.
Mini-Courses
As a component of its National AT Coalition grant, the SEAT Center contracted services with a school partner in Unit 5 School to develop a series of 10 Web-based mini-courses that will be completed in 2007. Topics for these courses will include 5 modules focusing on demonstrations of features and use of five commonly used AT applications, complemented by 5 modules related to integration of these technologies in classroom settings.
Division on Developmental Disabilities Best Practices
In collaboration with the Council for Exceptional Children, Division on Developmental Disabilities (DDD), Drs. Phil Parette and George Peterson-Karlan served as Co-Editors of Research-Based Practices in Developmental Disabilities (2nd ed.), to be published in 2007 by Pro-Ed. This textbook includes several chapters on AT co-authored by faculty members in the Department of Special Education.
Teacher-Focused Podcast
In November 2005, in collaboration with Infinitec and McLean County District Number 5, the SEAT Center participated in a pilot of the Building Educational Success Through Technology (BEST) Podcast, specifically designed and targeted to provide information to teachers about ways in which technology can be used to assist diverse learners. As a monthly podcast in 2006, it has received wide attention averaging 2,600 downloads monthly and has been featured in various electronic news sources including newspapers and organizational newsletters worldwide. Current and archived show notes can be accessed at http://bestpodcast.blogspot.com.
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Vision 2: Center of Access
Key Accomplishments:
• Professional activities
• External department presentations
• Accessible resource database
The second vision of the SEAT Center’s mission is to be a Center of Access to various constituencies involved in teaching, developing, and using the tools of technology. This vision has been addressed through (a) a range of professional activities, (b) delivery of external department presentations, and (c) maintenance of a resource database.
Professional Activities
The SEAT Center conducted a wide range of professional activities in response to requests from schools, and professional and student organizations (n=205). Presented in Table 1 are data pertaining to professional development activity in 2006.
Table 1
Core SEAT Personnel Professional Activities in 2006
Professional Activity
N
School consultation
35
Professional development activities
64
AT demonstrations
42
Preservice or student organization presentations
24
Professional organization activities
40
Total
205
External Department Presentations
One mechanism through which the Center afforded access to others was through the successful delivery of presentations for instructors and students on the ISU campus during 2006 (see Table 2). These presentations included a number of AT topics that addressed the facilitation of access to the general education curriculum. Increasing demand for SEAT access was reflected an approximate 487% increase in the number of students supported through these presentations in 2004, and substantive increase from total students served in 2002 (see Figure 1).
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Table 2
Number Students Supported in External ISU Department Presentations
N
N
05
06
Department
Geography
11
14
Foreign Language
12
12
Psychology
38
17
Speech Language Pathology
63
59
Interdisciplinary Course
215
59
Total
339
149
Number of Students Supported by External Department Presentations010020030040020022003200420052006YearsNumber ofStudents
Figure 1. Students served, 2002-2006.
Database Deployment
The SEAT Center hosts a substantial resource database to facilitate access by various constituencies on-line. Currently, the database has numerous components, including an equipment listing and print product listing that will be linked to extensive vendor database and resource scheduling database.
Vision 3: Center of Instructional Excellence
Key Accomplishments:
• Course support
• Field-based, pre-student teaching support three sites
• Expansion and maintenance of open computer lab
• Supervision of Illinois State University Instructional Technology Passport System-Competency 9 (ITPS-9) implementation
The third vision of the SEAT Center’s mission is to be a Center of Instructional Excellence. The SEAT Center is the nation’s only higher education technology facility that is linked to an undergraduate course of study. It is the only U.S.
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higher education technology center that provides all education majors at a university with a minimum level of assistive technology competency to work with students with disabilities who attend public schools. The Center serves 5,000 education majors—or one-fourth of the student population—at Illinois State University.
More specifically, these accomplishments were addressed through (a) special education course technical support; (b) clinical support; (c) maintenance of an open computer lab; and (d) supervision of ITPS-9 implementation in the College of Education.
Course Support
The SEAT Center provides technical support for five classes in the Department of Special Education (SED 356, 377, 379, 479, 498, 593.03). Presented in Table 3 are data regarding students served by class and semester.
Table 3
Number of Students Supported by SEAT Center by Course
2005
2006
Course
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Sp
Sum
Fall
Sp
Sum
Fall
Total
Total
SED 356
10
0
0
10
13
0
0
13
SED 377
130
21
132
283
132
15
95
242
SED 379
127
27
170
324
111
25
142
278
SED 452
23
0
0
23
29
0
0
29
SED 422
0
0
0
0
18
0
0
18
SED 454
0
0
0
0
10
0
0
10
SED 479
24
0
5
29
0
0
0
0
SED 489.11
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
SED493.11
5
0
0
5
5
0
0
5
SED 498
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
SED 593.03
13
0
0
13
12
0
0
12
PAS 360
63
0
0
63
59
0
0
59
Total
395
48
307
750
389
40
237
666
A total of 666 students were served in courses supported by the SEAT Center during 2006, which is slightly lower than the statistic from 2006 (see Figure 2) due to a reported decrease in the accepted number of students to the university. Courses delivered in the Center are supported with (a) specialized equipment and materials funded via a federal grant, donations from vendors, and private gifts; (b) ‘open lab hours’; and (c) instruction consultation/collaboration with SEAT Center staff.
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Number of Studens Supported by SEAT Center in Courses020040060080020022003200420052006Years
Figure 3. Student support by courses, 2002-2006.
Field-Based, Pre-Student Teaching Support
The SEAT Center also provided support to students in field-based sites, including Peoria, McLean, and Chicago. As noted in Table 4, a total of 162 students across these three sites benefited from SEAT Center support. AT presentations are typically made on a targeted inservice day for students participating in field-based settings.
Table 4
Number of Field-Based Students Supported by SEAT Center
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Sp
Fall
Sp
Sum 06
Fall
Site
Total
Total
‘05
‘05
‘05
‘06
‘05
‘06
Peoria
26
21
20
0
29
47
49
McLean
30
24
18
15
33
54
66
Chicago
25
30
15
0
32
55
47
Total
81
75
156
53
15
94
162
Open Computer Lab
An open computer laboratory is maintained by the SEAT Center using two classroom computer laboratories (Fairchild Hall 323 and 324). The 2006 calendar year was the first year in which FH323 lab was active for the Spring, Summer, and Fall Semesters. This has allowed greater access to the SEAT Center’s resources by students, for classroom use, and for presentations and workshops. In late Spring, ‘06, 21 new laptop computers were purchased to replace, in part, the previous laptop computers. Both labs are used to support curricula offerings across departments at ISU, and are the sites through which all
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education majors develop mandated technology competencies by the College. Trends in increasing lab hour usage are reflected in Table 5 and Figure 4.
Table 5
Total Open Lab Hours of Operation and Student Usage by Semester
N
N
2005
2006
Sp
Sum
Fall
Sp
Sum
Fall
Total
Total
Wkly Hrs. Open
41
40.52
384.5
66
108.2
70.5
2494
3482.4
N Students
1356
307
1876
1722
384
2014
3539
4120
1ServedIncludes ITPS-9 students 1
2 Open lab availability; not always staffed by SEAT personnel
3 Combined open lab hours for Fairchild Rooms 323 and 324
Open Lab Hours and Students Served05001000150020002500300035004000450020022003200420052006YearsHours and Students ServedOpen HoursStudents
Figure 4. Open lab hours and students served, 2002-2006.
ITPS-9 Implementation
The SEAT Center also coordinated delivery of instruction for all Illinois State University teacher candidates participating in the Illinois Technology Passport System Competency 9: Assistive Technology (ITPS-9). Implemented in Fall ’03 semester, ITPS-9 is required for all teacher education candidates. The SEAT Center assumes responsibility for providing on-line and hands-on training to all Illinois State University students pursuing a teaching degree (~1,200 students per year; > 5,000 total students majoring in education).
In order to meet ITPS-9, all students enrolled in special education (except Deaf and Hard of Hearing) and all early childhood majors are required to take SED 379, Introduction to Assistive Technology. All teacher education students not
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taking SED 379 must complete a two-stage process: (a) Stage 1 requires completion of an online module of instruction and assessment requirement; and (b) Stage 2 requires a hands-on performance experience and assessment (see Figure 5). Completion of these two stages requires students to be physically present in the SEAT Center lab.
Figure 5. ITPS flowchart.
Vision 4: Center of Accessible Technology Solutions
Key Accomplishments:
• Inventory expansion
• Disability Concerns Advisory Board
The fourth vision of the SEAT Center’s mission is to be a Center of Accessible Technology Solutions. In 2006, this component was addressed by increasing the equipment inventory of the SEAT Center to a level approximating a market value of $800,000. The Director also served on the Advisory Board of Disability Concerns on the ISU campus.
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Vision 5: State, National, and International Partner with Education and Industry.
Key Accomplishments:
Partnership activities with:
• Infinitec
• University of Kansas
• NCTI
• ATIA
• DDD
• Software vendors
• ICHF and District 87
• HILIA
• NASP
• Chicago Teacher Education Pipeline
• DODEA
• Thailand
The fifth vision of the SEAT Center’s mission is to be a state, national, and international partner with education and industry. This component is addressed through collaborative activities including (a) Infinitec; (b) University of Kansas; (c) National Center for Technology Innovation (NCTI); (d) Assistive Technology Industry Association (ATIA); (e) Division on Developmental Disabilities (DDD); (f) software vendors; (g) Illinois Children’s Healthcare Foundation (ICHF); (h) Heart of Illinois Low Incidence Association (HILIA); (i) National Association of School Psychologists (NASP); (j) Chicago Teacher Education Pipeline; and (k) U.S. Department of Defense Education Activity (DODEA).
Infinitec Partnership
A U.S. Department of Education federal grant (National AT Coalition) awarded to the SEAT Center in 2005 to support its partnership with Infinitec continued through 2006. The subcontract awarded to Infinitec for expansion of the Illinois coalition and creation one new state coalition was completed in July. The Kansas Coalition, represents 154 school districts, 797 schools, and almost 250,000 students. The coalition has sponsored AT workshops for coalition members and through a group purchase program for AT devices saved school districts $33,000. A range of specific accomplishments through the partnership with Infinitec are presented in the Final Report companion document (National Assistive Technology Coalition).
University of Kansas
Based on collaboration with Infinitec and its development of a Kansas AT Coalition, the SEAT Center is working with the University of Kansas to produce a series of Web-delivered professional development modules for teachers—Access AT, which includes assistive technology to support writing, reading,
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mathematics, and personal management.
National Center for Technology Innovation (NCTI)
Subsequent to a successful national AT Outcomes Summit held in Chicago in December ’05, a third outcomes summit—Vendors Pre-Conference: Strategies for Smart Marketing–was planned for January 24, 2007, in partnership with NCTI. The emphasis of this activity is to engage industry leaders with the process of research collaborations with schools and institutions of higher learning. The Center has also collaborated with NCTI on several scholarly activities discussed previously (i.e., Project SOLO™ and a Writing Matrix).
Assistive Technology Industry Association (ATIA)
In collaboration with ATIA, the SEAT Center published the third volume of Assistive Technology Outcomes and Benefits (see http://www.atia.org/atob/ATOBWeb/index.htm) that is both cross-disability and transdisciplinary. Averaging more than 4,000 downloads per month, the journal publishes articles related to the outcomes and benefits of assistive technology (AT) across the lifespan. A Call for Papers for the fourth volume is currently underway. Hard copy production of the journal will be initiated in 2007, coupled with several additional monographs emerging from themes identified at the AT Outcomes Summit hosted by the SEAT Center in ‘05. The SEAT Director serves as Editor, and the SEAT Coordinator serves as Production Manager. The Center also supports podcasting of targeted events at the ATIA Annual Meeting in Orlando, FL.
Division on Developmental Disabilities (DDD)
The Center provided a scholarly service to the DDD of the Council for Exceptional Children through involvement in publishing a textbook, Research-Based Practices in Developmental Disabilities. The Director has served as President of this international organization this past year, and has worked to ensure that AT is included in publications and conferences planned by the Division. The SEAT Center was invited to develop and deliver a pre-conference workshop titled, “Facilitating Student Achievement Using Assistive Technology,” at the 10th International Conference on Cognitive Disabilities/Mental Retardation, Autism, and Other Developmental Disabilities held in Kona, Hawaii in January ’07.
Software Vendors
The SEAT Center served as a professional development training site for six software vendors in ’06, including IntelliTools, Inc.; Kurzweil Educational Systems; Mayer-Johnson, Crick Software, Applied Human Factors, and Don Johnston, Inc. Based on its research with SOLO™, a product marketed by Don
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Johnston, Inc., SEAT personnel have provided consultation to this vendor regarding upgrades to reporting features in its software. Also, Mayer Johnson, Inc. has expressed interest in supporting the research efforts of a preschool project coordinated by the SEAT Center (described below) regarding the effectiveness of its software, Writing with Symbols.
Illinois Children’s Healthcare Foundation (ICHF) and District 87
In partnership with District 87, Sara Raymond Early Childhood Education Center, and through funding from the ICHF, the Making A Difference Using Assistive Technology (MDAT) served more than 300 preschoolers in 9 classrooms in ‘06. An assistive technology toolkit was used by teachers in classrooms to help children develop emergent writing skills. Project accomplishments include (a) compilation and scoring of monthly child writing samples; (c) completion of assessments of all children using standardized literacy assessments; (c) collaboration with the Illinois State University Department of Speech and Audiology who provided graduate students for classroom language activities and data gathering; (d) intensive professional development activities for teachers including 5 training sessions and eight 2-hour user group sessions; and (e) initiation of a series of research studies to examine the effectiveness of specific AT tools with this population; and (f)
Heart of Illinois Low Incidence Association (HILIA)
The SEAT Center collaborates with HILIA, a regional special education cooperative that operates comprehensive education programs for children, ages three to 21, with hearing, vision, physical, or multiple disabilities. SEAT Center personnel (a) are members of the HILIA Professional Development Academy; and (b) participate on the Professional Development Committee, which plans all annual professional development activities. Recommendations were made by SEAT personnel regarding evidence-based curricula in response to the Response to Intervention (RTI) mandate of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004.
National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)
The Director conducted a workshop, “Assessment for Assistive Technology,” at the NASP 2006 Annual Convention. Based on this collaboration, NASP and the SEAT Center are collaborating to revise the professional development module, Preparing All Teachers for Assistive Technology, for distribution nationally to school psychologists as part of NASP’s professional development series. The SEAT Center is currently conducting research with the NASP membership to develop a baseline understanding of current AT practices among these school professionals.
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Chicago Teacher Education Pipeline
The SEAT Center has initiated conversations with the Director of the College of Education’s Chicago Teacher Education Pipeline to provide English as a Second Language (ESL) teachers in Chicago with AT professional development using modules that have been or will be developed.
U. S. Department of Defense Education Activity (DODEA)
In March, the Director visited the DODEA in Washington, DC and discussed future professional development collaborations between the SEAT Center and DODEA school personnel in Europe. Two proposals for workshop participation were submitted, and interest in future collaboration was expressed by DODEA.
Thailand
Seat Center staff have provided AT training to a number of education professionals assigned to the College of Education this year. The Ministry of Education is developing an extensive AT service delivery system in Thailand, and a proposal has been presented regarding an ongoing professional development relationship between SEAT Center personnel and education professionals across Thailand.
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APPENDIX A
Scholarly Productivity
Presentations (State, National, International Peer-Reviewed)
Beck, A. R., Stoner, J. B., Bock, S., & Parton, T. (2006, November). PECS versus VOCA: A replication. Presented at the 2006 American Speech and Hearing Association (ASHA), Miami Beach, FL.
Beck, A., Stoner, J., & Dennis, M. (2006). Use of PECS and other augmentative communication techniques by children and adults with developmental disabilities. Paper presented at Illinois Speech-Langague-Hearing Association Convention, Rosemont, Ill.
Beck, A., Stoner, J., & Dennis, M. (2006, Nov.) Using aided language stimulation with adults with disabilities. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention, Miami Florida.
Hourcade, J. J., Pilotte, T. E., Parette, P., & Cramer, S. (2006, April). Technology and emergent literacy in students with severe communication and developmental delays. Paper presented at the Council for Exceptional Children Annual Convention and Expo, Salt Lake City, UT.
Parette, H. P. (2006, October). Technology and inclusion of students with disabilities: Digital challenges of preparing future educators. Keynote presentation at the 1st Pacific-Rim Conference on Education, Sapporo, Japan.
Parette, H. P., Stoner, J., Watts, E., & Wojcik, B. W. (2006, January). Writing literacy outcomes using an AT toolkit approach. Paper presented to the Assistive Technology Industry Association (ATIA) Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL.
Parette, H. P., Wojcik, B. W., & Crowley, P. (2006, April). An assistive technology toolkit for students with emotional/behavioral disorders. Paper presented at the Council for Exceptional Children Annual Convention and Expo, Salt Lake City, UT.
Parette, P., Dikter, D., Peterson-Karlan, G. R., & Wojcik, B. (2006, January). Guidelines for submitting manuscripts to assistive technology outcomes and benefits. Paper presented to the Assistive Technology Industry Association (ATIA) Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL.
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Parette, P., Stoner, J., Watts, E., & Wojcik, B. W. (2006, January). Using AT toolkits to develop early writing skills with preschoolers. Paper presented to the Technology, Reading, and Learning Difficulties World Conference, San Francisco, CA.
Parette, P., Wehmeyer, M., Peterson-Karlan, G., Myles, B. S., Wheeler, J. J., Van Laarhoven T., & Zager, D. B. (2006, April). Research-based and emerging best practices in DD/autism: Where are we going? Showcase presentation for the Division on Developmental Disabilities at the Council for Exceptional Children Annual Convention and Expo, Salt Lake City, UT.
Peterson-Karlan, G. R., Wojcik, B. W., & Parette, H. P. (2006, April). Evaluating outcomes of AT-based writing interventions. Paper presented at the Council for Exceptional Children Annual Convention and Expo, Salt Lake City, UT.
Peterson-Karlan, G. R., Wojcik, B. W., & Parette, H. P. (2006, January). Effect of technology on writing outcomes of students with academic disabilities. Paper presented to the Technology, Reading, and Learning Difficulties World Conference, San Francisco, CA.
Stoner, J. B., Angell, M. E., Parette, H. P., & Bailey, R. L. (2006, April). Factors affecting the use of alternative and augmentative communication: Perspectives of parents/guardians. Poster presentation at the Council for Exceptional Children Annual Convention and Expo, Salt Lake City, UT.
Wojcik, B. W., Peterson-Karlan, G. R., & Parette, H. P. (2006, April). Blending online and traditional professional development in AT. Paper presented at the Council for Exceptional Children Annual Convention and Expo, Salt Lake City, UT.
Wojcik, B. W., Peterson-Karlan, G. R., & Parette, H. P. (2007, January). Mini courses: Professional development on-demand. Paper presented to the Assistive Technology Industry Association (ATIA) Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL.
Publications
Bailey, R. L., Parette, H. P., Stoner, J., Angell, M. E., Carroll, K. (2006). Family members’ perceptions of augmentative and alternative communication use. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 37, 1-11.
Bailey, R. L., Stoner, J., Parette, H. P., & Angell, M. E. (2006). AAC team perceptions: Augmentative and alternative communication device use. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 41(2), 139-154.
Bakken, J. P., & Parette, P. (2006). Using technology to advance multicultural special education. In F. E. Obiakor (Ed.), Multicultural special education (pp. 272-289). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill-Prentice Hall.
Beck, A. (in press). Using technology to enhance and augment communication of persons with developmental disabilities. In H. P. Parette, & G. R. Peterson-Karlan (Eds.), Research- based practices in developmental disabilities.
Beck, A., Bock, S., Thompson, J.R., Bowman, L., & Robbins, S. (2006). Is awesome really awesome? How the inclusion of information terms on an AAC device influences children’s attitudes towards peers who use AAC. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 27, 56-69.
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Beck, A., Stoner, J., Bock, S., & Parton, T. (in press). Comparison of PECS and the use of a VOCA: A replication. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities.
Dudek, K., Beck, A., & Thompson, J. (2006). The influence of AAC device type, dynamic vs. static screen, on peer attitudes. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21, 17-27.
Parette, H. P. (2006). Technology and inclusion of students with disabilities: Digital challenges of preparing future educators. In K. Hanji (Ed.), The 1st Pacific-Rim Conference on Education (pp. 36-37, 90-91). Sapporo, JP: Hokkaido University of Education.
Parette, H. P., & Peterson-Karlan, G. R. (Eds.). (in press). Research-based practices in developmental disabilities (2nd ed.). Instructor’s manual. Austin, TX: Pro-Ed. (290 pp. of text)
Parette, H. P., & Peterson-Karlan, G. R. (Eds.). (in press). Research-based practices in developmental disabilities (2nd ed.). Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.
Parette, H. P., & Peterson-Karlan, G. R. (in press). Introduction and scope of textbook. In H. P. Parette & G. R. Peterson-Karlan (Eds.), Research-based practices in developmental disabilities (2nd ed.). Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.
Parette, H. P., Huer, M. B., & Peterson-Karlan, G. R. (in press). Working with persons with developmental disabilities across cultures. In H. P. Parette & G. R. Peterson-Karlan (Eds.), Research-based practices in developmental disabilities (2nd ed.). Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.
Parette, H. P., Peterson-Karlan, G. R., Smith, S. J., Gray, T., & Silver-Pacuilla, H. (2006). The state of assistive technology: Themes from an outcomes summit. Assistive Technology Outcomes and Benefits, 3, 15-33.
Parette, H. P., Wojcik, B. W., & Bardi, N. (in press). Monitor that progress! Interpreting data trends for AT decision-making. Teaching Exceptional Children.
Parette, P. (2006, Fall). President’s message. DDD Express, 17(3), 2.
Parette, P. (2006, Winter). President’s message. DDD Express, 17(4), 2.
Parette, P., & Dikter, D. (2006). Outcomes and benefits in assistive technology service delivery. Assistive Technology Outcomes and Benefits, 3, 11-14.
Peterson-Karlan, G. R., & Parette, H. P. (in press). Integration of technology into the curriculum. In H. P. Parette & G. R. Peterson-Karlan (Eds.), Research-based practices in developmental disabilities (2nd ed.). Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.
Peterson-Karlan, G. R., Wojik, B. W., & Parette, H. P. (2006). The effectiveness of SOLO™ on the writing outcomes of students with learning and academic disabilities (Final Report to the National Center on Technology Innovation, Illinois State University, Special Education Assistive Technology Center. Retrieved October 10, 2006, from http://www.nationaltechcenter.org/rfp/projectSOLOwritingoutcomes.asp
Scherer, M., & Parette, P. (in press). Assistive technology. In E. Druin & S. A. Sisto (Eds., Therapeutic interventions for patients with spinal cord injuries. Philadelphia: Elsevier, Inc.
Stoner, J. B. (in press). Language and ASD: The impact on the classroom. In H. P. Parette & G. R. Peterson-Karlan (Eds.), Research-based practices in developmental disabilities (2nd ed.). Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.
SEAT Center 2006 Annual Report 20
Stoner, J. B., Parette, H. P., Watts, E. H., Wojcik, B. W., & Fogal, T. (in press). Preschool teacher perceptions of assistive technology and professional development responses. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities.
Stoner, J., Beck, A.R., Bock, S.J., Hickey, K., Kosuwan, K., Thompson, J. R. (2006). The effectiveness of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) with nonspeaking adults. Remedial and Special Education, 27, 154-165.
External Funding Proposals
Parette, H. P. (2006). Including school-age children using assistive technology. Pre-proposal submitted to the Mitsubishi Electric Foundation.
Parette, H. P. (2006). Consideration of assistive technology: Strategies for teams. Workshop series proposal submitted to the U.S. Department of Defense Education Activity (DODEA).
Parette, H. P. (2006). Assistive technology ability building. Workshop series proposal submitted to the U.S. Department of Defense Education Activity (DODEA).
Parette, H. P. (2006). Including young children using assistive technology. Pre-proposal submitted to the Mitsubishi Electric Foundation.
Parette, H. P. (2006). Special Education Assistive Technology (SEAT) Center. Proposal submitted to the Honda Foundation.
Parette, H. P. (2006). The eSEAT Center. Proposal submitted to the AT&T Excelerator Program.
Parette, H. P., & Peterson-Karlan, G. R. (2006). National assistive technology (AT) coalition. No-cost grant continuation proposal for Fall, 2006.
Parette, H. P., & Peterson-Karlan, G. R. (2006). National assistive technology (AT) coalition. No-cost grant continuation proposal for Spring, 2007.
Parette, H. P., (2006). National AT professional development and portal. Federal request prepared for the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. ($500,000, pending)
Parette, H. P., Stoner, J., & Watts, E. (2005). Making a difference using assistive technology. (2005). Grant submitted to the Illinois Children’s Healthcare Foundation.

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