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Redbird media: Latest books from ISU faculty

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The Reflexivity of Pain and Privilege: Auto-Ethnographic Collections of Mixed Identity

Edited by Ellis Hurd, professor, School of Teaching and Learning (Brill, 2019)

Professor Ellis Hurd’s book brings to light stories of scholars and authors who navigate the worlds of teaching, research, and family through a lens of mixed identity. The goal of the book is to offer insights to those who teach middle-level education and young diverse learners, and it shares experiences of authors who have worked and studied across the globe. The concept of belonging, but feeling apart, defines the “pain and privilege” cycle of having a mixed identity, according to Hurd.

The Joke Is on Us: Political Comedy in (Late) Neoliberal Times

Edited by Julie Webber, professor, Department of Politics and Government (Lexington Books, 2018)

The Joke Is on Us offers perspectives from scholars in media studies, cultural studies, comparative literature, political theory, and sociology. Most of the essays confront the role of humor in popular culture after the Great Recession of 2008 with essays on youth, media and entertainment, Turkey, Brexit, and horror-comedy. In addition to editing the book, Webber contributed a look at so-called “alt-right” humor after the 2016 presidential election.

Atenco Lives! Filmmaking and Popular Struggle in Mexico        

By Livia Stone, assistant professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology (Vanderbilt University Press, 2019)

Assistant Professor Livia Stone examines how the production and sharing of documentaries became an important part of the story for the People’s Front in Defense of Land of Atenco (also known as the Frente). A grassroots organization of farmers, the Frente was a strong force in politics until a government crackdown in 2006. Seeking to quash the influence of the Frente over the 13 villages that compose Atenco, more than 3,000 police in riot gear stormed the area. Stone profiles some of the most influential documentaries that exposed the brutalities of the crackdown in Atenco.

Black Feminism in Qualitative Inquiry: A Mosaic for Writing Our Daughter’s Body  

By Venus E. Evans-Winters, professor, Department of Educational Administration and Foundations and Women’s and Gender Studies Program (Routledge, 2019)

Black Feminism in Qualitative Inquiry: A Mosaic for Writing Our Daughter’s Body engages qualitative inquiry to center the concerns of black women as researchers and the researched while simultaneously questioning the ostensible innocence of qualitative inquiry, including methods of data collection, processes of data analysis, and representations of human experiences and identities. The text centers “daughtering” as the tool for approaches to black feminist and critical race data analysis in qualitative inquiry. Advanced and novice researchers interested in decolonizing methodologies and liberatory tools of analysis will find the text useful for cultural, education, political, and racial critiques.

Some of the information from these summaries came from the
authors and their publishers. Books, audio and video recordings,
and mobile applications created by Illinois State University faculty,
staff, and students are eligible for inclusion in this section. Submit
entries to kdberse@IllinoisState.edu. For more listings, visit
IllinoisState.edu/RedbirdScholar.

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I love this format keep it up

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