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Are you ready to help students with Autism Spectrum Disorder?

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More students with Autism Spectrum Disorder are entering college. Learn how to best help them thrive in the academy.

The number of students diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) continues to rise, and many students with ASD are now graduating from high school and entering college classrooms. But some students may enter the university undiagnosed or may choose not to self-identify. This can lead to unique challenges for both them and their instructors.

Join experts from Student Access and Accommodation Services and the Illinois Center for Specialized Professional Support for a special afternoon of faculty professional development. They will present Working with Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder on Monday, September 11 from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. as part of the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Technology’s fall workshops that meet AAC&U guidelines for high-impact educational practices. Learn about the characteristics of ASD, discuss what a student with ASD might need in a college classroom setting, and explore strategies to help students be successful in the classroom. Participants will hear from faculty who have had students with ASD and will explore how often-overlooked classroom behaviors (such as the inability to understand peer and instructor nonverbal cues and trouble with group work) that may undermine a student’s success.

Registration is required for this free event, which will be held at CTLT’s facility at 301 S. Main St.  If you need a special accommodation to fully participate, please contact the CTLT main desk at (309) 438-2542.

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